Tag beans

Food52’s Smokin’ Hot Vegan Vaquero Chili

I found the recipe for SpiceBoxTravelsSmokin’ Hot Vegan Vaquero Chili soon after the food-blogger posted it on Food52, and I couldn’t stop thinking about it. In part, I was fascinated by the beans themselves: no boring brown, the Vaquero is dappled in black and white, patterned like an Appaloosa horse.

Vaquero beans, chipotle, orange pepper, onion, carrots, spices

But the recipe also got me thinking: Given The Professor’s focus on taste, interestingness, and satisfaction, a good chili would be an easy A+, right? Mouth-tingling flavor? Check. Belly-filling beans? Check. And this recipe, with its surprise ingredient, seemed to check the interesting column too.

I had to try it ASAP. So I Googled myself to heirloom bean-grower Rancho Gordo‘s website to order some Vaquero beans, waited a week for UPS to deliver the beauties, and started them soaking.

Then I diced and sauteed and boiled. And boiled some more. And a few minutes more. Finally the beans were done and I stirred in the surprise ingredient: dark chocolate.

Food52’s tester had noted that “Adding the melting chocolate at the end more than compensated for the depth meat would have added, and rounded things out for a great balance of flavors.” The tester also mentioned that she had adjusted the spice, adding just one of the chipotles in adobo sauce that the recipe called for and only a pinch of cayenne.

So with the kids in mind, I added just one chipotle and nixed the cayenne altogether. I also cut down on the chocolate — a little. And there my problems began. For the recipe to work, the sweetness needed to balance the smokin’ heat. Yet I hadn’t added much of the spice. So the result was too sweet for The Professor and me, and yet still too spicy for the kids.

The Cook will try SpiceBoxTravelsSmokin’ Hot Vegan Vaquero Chili again in a few years, when her eaters are ready for more spice. In the meantime, any curious cooks out there should try this recipe. As The Professor said, “The chocolate makes the recipe very rich.” And when a meat-lover calls a vegan dish “rich,” that’s saying something.

You can find the recipe here. Note: I had to cook the beans much longer than the recipe indicates.

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City Kitchen — a New NYT Cooking Column by David Tanis

David Tanis — a cookbook author and longtime chef at Berkeley’s Chez Panisse — just kicked off a new column for The New York Times called City Kitchen. The column is about cooking at home and, more specifically, about cooking in cramped city kitchens. But no matter the size of your kitchen, the column promises to be great source of cooking insight and experience.

His debut column — titled “Small Space, Big Flavor: First, Start the Beans” — reminded me that I’m a dolt for not cooking with dried beans. As Tanis writes, “a small batch of freshly cooked beans is well worth the little effort it takes to get them cooked. … Don’t cave and go the canned-bean route — save those for emergencies or camping trips.”

I’m going to throw my can opener away. Or at least as The Professor to hide it.

In any case, check out the column and the accompanying recipe for Cannellini Bean Salad with Shaved Spring Vegetables, which looks delicious.